Thanks! Even if I can’t finish it in time, I think I’m still going to try. They sound fantastic.

They have their flaws; but all in all, they’re full of interesting and well-developed characters, plot lines that carry on through all the books, and plenty of twists! I think you’ll love them.

What do you think, should I read the books before I watch the show?

I always recommend reading the books first, only because they’re SO GOOD. But honestly the show is doing a great job at introducing everything, so I don’t think you’re going to miss too much (if it all goes how this episode did). But the books are definitely worth the read! I don’t know if you’ll have time to read the whole first one before it premieres, though. They’re super long (which I love). :P

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Fashion! Put It All On Me ➝  Paolo Sebastian f/w 2014-15

(via suburbanwit)

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animalics:

Guinea Pigs are natural swimmers, but have to be introduced to the water slowly so they don’t panic

animalics:

Guinea Pigs are natural swimmers, but have to be introduced to the water slowly so they don’t panic

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tastefullyoffensive:

[zackychainz]
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huffpostworld:

Teens get a bad rap for the number of hours they log in front of their computers, but this group of students is using their screen time for something really wonderful.

These Brazilian teens video-chatting with elderly Americans is actually the sweetest thing.

(via leolilac)

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btvsgif:

Willow Rosenberg’s transformation from a shy, geeky girl to a dark, angry wicca was present right from the beginning of season one.  Throughout the seasons, she is often painted as insecure and easily bullied around by her peers.  However, when she begins to use magic, Willow is authoritative and demanding of her peers.  Her desire to have this constant control keeps building up (her attempt in Something Blue to get whatever she wants, Willow stealing a dark magic book in Tough Love, etc.) until Willow becomes addicted to magic to live her life.

(via suethepirate)

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